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Salem Witch Trials - The People

Individuals involved in the Salem witch trials of 1692: accusers, accused, judges and others in Salem Village and the wider Puritan community. Includes biographies, testimony, petitions and other documents.
  1. Afflicted and Accusers (9)
  2. Accused Witchs of Salem (65)
  3. Judges and Officials (8)
  4. Ministers (16)

Salem Witch Trials Timeline
A chronological view of the events of Salem. This timeline may make it easier to see patterns in what happened to who and why.

Victims of the Salem Witch Trials
Twenty-four (and maybe more) people died. In alphabetical order, find those who were executed or who died in prison after being accused of witchcraft.

Salem Witch Trials Judges
Who were judges in the Salem witch trials, and in what capacity did each serve? Find out from this list.

Salem Witch Trials
Map, drawn in the 1860s, shows the likely location of most houses in Salem Village, with a legend to show who lived where.

Members of Salem Village Church
In 1689, the Salem Village church organized formally. Here is the list of members, some of whom went on to play important parts in the Salem witch trials.

John Alden Jr.
Son of Mayflower travelers Priscilla Mullins and John Alden -- known from the Longfellow poem, John Alden Jr.was accused in the Salem witch trials. He escaped possible execution by the simple act of fleeing the jail.

Bridget Bishop
Bridget Bishop biography - a profile of Bridget Bishop, accused of witchcraft during the 1692 Salem witch trials, and the first to be hanged.

Edward Bishop and Sarah Bishop
Biography of Edward Bishop and Sarah Bishop, figures in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

George Burroughs
George Burroughs, executed in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts, was the former minister of Salem Village.

Martha Carrier
Martha Carrier was accused of witchcraft and was among those executed in the Salem witch trials.

Sarah Cloyce
Sarah Cloyce was accused in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts. Two of her sisters were executed.

Giles Corey
Giles Corey, accused as a wizard or witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts, was pressed to death for refusing to plead either guilty or not guilty.

Elizabeth Colson
Biography of Elizabeth Colson, figure in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts who apparently eluded capture after being accused as a witch.

Martha Corey
Martha Corey was hanged as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts. Her husband was tortured to death just a few days before her own execution.

Lydia Dustin
Lydia Dustin biography - a profile of Lydia Dustin, who died in prison after being accused of witchcraft during the 1692 Salem witch trials.

Rebecca Eames
Rebecca Eames was a spectator at one of the Salem witch hangings when she was arrested and charged with witchcraft herself.

Mary Easty
Mary Easty, sister of Rebecca Nurse and Sarah Cloyce, was hanged as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

Sarah Good
Sarah Good was hanged as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts. Her daughter, 4 or 5 years old, was also accused, and her newborn infant died in jail.

Rebecca Nurse
Rebecca Nurse, a respectable matriarch of Salem Village, was executed as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

Elizabeth Parris (Betty Parris)
Elizabeth (Betty) Parris was one of the earliest afficted girls and accusers in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts. Her father was the Salem Village minister, Rev. Samuel Parris.

Mary Sibley - Salem Witch Trials
Was the real Mary Sibley an innocent neighbor trying to be helpful, or a diabolical figure?

Abigail Williams
Abigail Williams was one of the accusers in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

Books on the Salem Witch Trials
A selection of the best books to read to learn more about the New England witch hunts. Some books look at why most of the accused were women; others focus on alternate explanations, including legal rules, disease, psychology, religion and so forth.

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