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Accused Witches in the Salem Witch Trials

Who were the accused witches in the Salem witch trials? These resources include those who were executed, died in prison, found guilty but escaped punishment, found not guilty, etc.
  1. Bridget Bishop (4)
  2. Elizabeth and John Proctor (2)
  3. George Burroughs (4)
  4. Mary Easty (7)
  5. Rebecca Nurse (8)
  6. Sarah Good (4)
  7. Tituba (5)

Victims of the Salem Witch Trials
Twenty-four (and maybe more) people died. In alphabetical order, find those who were executed or who died in prison after being accused of witchcraft.

John Alden Jr.
John Alden Jr. was the son of Mayflower travelers Priscilla Mullins and John Alden -- known from the Longfellow poem. The son became embroiled in the Salem witch trials, and managed to escape possible execution by the simple act of fleeing the jail.

Bridget Bishop
Bridget Bishop biography - a profile of Bridget Bishop, accused of witchcraft during the 1692 Salem witch trials, and the first to be hanged.

Edward Bishop and Sarah Bishop
Biography of Edward Bishop and Sarah Bishop, figures in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

Martha Carrier
Martha Carrier, described by Cotton Mather as a "rampant hag," was executed as a witch in the Salem witch trials.

Sarah Cloyce
Sarah Cloyce was accused in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts. Two of her sisters were executed.

Elizabeth Colson
Biography of Elizabeth Colson, figure in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts who apparently eluded capture after being accused as a witch.

Giles Corey
Giles Corey, accused as a wizard or witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts, was pressed to death for refusing to plead either guilty or not guilty.

Martha Corey
Martha Corey was hanged as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts. Her husband was tortured to death just a few days before her own execution.

Lydia Dustin
Lydia Dustin biography - a profile of Lydia Dustin, who died in prison after being accused of witchcraft during the 1692 Salem witch trials.

Rebecca Eames
Rebecca Eames was a spectator at one of the Salem witch hangings when she was arrested and charged with witchcraft herself.

Mary Easty
Mary Easty, sister of Rebecca Nurse and Sarah Cloyce, was hanged as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

Rebecca Nurse
Rebecca Nurse, a respectable matriarch of Salem Village, was executed as a witch in the Salem witch trials of 17th century colonial Massachusetts.

List of all Persons Accused of Witchcraft in 1692
An exhaustive list of those against whom warrants or complaints were filed. Includes their name, town and the date of the initial complaint or warrant.

List of Defenders Connected with Salem Village
A list of those who testified in defense of accused witches, signed a petition in their favor, giving skeptical testimony and other defenders.

Persons Accused of Witchcraft
A list of the accused in the Salem witch trials.

Petitions for Compensation and Decisions
Cases of Mary Easty, Sarah Good and Dorcas Good are included in the petitions, and decisions for Elizabeth How, George Jacobs, Mary Easty, George Burroughs, Giles Corey, Rebeccah Nurse, John Willard, Sarah Good, Martha Carrier, Samuel Wardwell and wife, John Proctor and wife, Sarah Wild, Mary Bradbury, Abigail Foster, Anne Foster, Rebeccah Eames, Dorcas Hoar, Mary Post and Mary Lacey.

Petitions of Two Convicted Witches Awaiting Executions
Page includes the text of petitions of Mary Easty and John Proctor, questioning their convictions and asserting their innocence.

Carey Document: On the Trail of A Death Warrant
Exposure of one death warrant, supposedly from Salem, 1692, as a fake.

Deliverance Hobbs
Biography of an accused Salem witch who confessed and then served as a witness against other witches, including her husband and the Rev. George Burroughs.

Arrest Warrant: Elizabeth Proctor and Sarah Cloyce
Reproduction and transcription of the April 4, 1692, document accusing two women of witchcraft.

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